Beaches In U.s.a

HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif. – As sheets of oil washed on shore, the mayor of this surfing hub made a dire forecast: The community could be looking at an environmental disaster that could linger for years.

Birds released after being rescued from oil ridden waters off the coast of California > USA TODAY See more videos "> See more videos > > > > > What to watch next
  • Colin Powell addressing the Veterans of Foreign Wars in 1991. Colin Powell addressing the Veterans of Foreign Wars in 1991.>

    Colin Powell dies at 84

    CNN Logo CNN
  • Messages sent before kidnapping in Haiti show last location of group Messages sent before kidnapping in Haiti show last location of group>

    Messages sent before kidnapping in Haiti show last location of group

    CNN Logo CNN
  • Mother of Ahmaud Arbery: We will get justice for Ahmaud Mother of Ahmaud Arbery: We will get justice for Ahmaud>

    Mother of Ahmaud Arbery: We will get justice for Ahmaud

    MSNBC Logo MSNBC
  • Tucker theorizes why Christopher Steele, who made lewd claims about Trump, is making a comeback Tucker theorizes why Christopher Steele, who made lewd claims about Trump, is making a comeback>

    Tucker theorizes why Christopher Steele, who made lewd claims about Trump, is making a comeback

    FOX News Logo FOX News
  • Local Matters: Top democrats campaign for McAuliffe to increase Black voter support in Virginia Local Matters: Top democrats campaign for McAuliffe to increase Black voter support in Virginia>

    Local Matters: Top democrats campaign for McAuliffe to increase Black voter support in Virginia

    CBS News Logo CBS News
  • Former President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on September 25, 2021 in Perry, Georgia. Former President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on September 25, 2021 in Perry, Georgia.>

    'Not surprised:' Lawmaker reacts to Trump suing her committee

    CNN Logo CNN
  • How right-wing groups are catalyzing culture war battles in schools How right-wing groups are catalyzing culture war battles in schools>

    How right-wing groups are catalyzing culture war battles in schools

    MSNBC Logo MSNBC
  • Colin Powell, first Black secretary of state, dies at age 84 Colin Powell, first Black secretary of state, dies at age 84>

    Colin Powell, first Black secretary of state, dies at age 84

    CBS News Logo CBS News
  • Unvaccinated Americans protest mandates as the pace of new vaccinations slows Unvaccinated Americans protest mandates as the pace of new vaccinations slows>

    Unvaccinated Americans protest mandates as the pace of new vaccinations slows

    CBS News Logo CBS News
  • Venezuelan president threatens retaliation after ally extradited to U.S. Venezuelan president threatens retaliation after ally extradited to U.S.>

    Venezuelan president threatens retaliation after ally extradited to U.S.

    NBC News Logo NBC News
  • U.S. working to free kidnapped missionaries in Haiti U.S. working to free kidnapped missionaries in Haiti>

    U.S. working to free kidnapped missionaries in Haiti

    CBS News Logo CBS News
  • Reflecting on the life and legacy of Colin Powell Reflecting on the life and legacy of Colin Powell>

    Reflecting on the life and legacy of Colin Powell

    CBS News Logo CBS News
  • Local Matters: Oklahoma schools superintendent leaves Republican party, challenges governor in 2022 race Local Matters: Oklahoma schools superintendent leaves Republican party, challenges governor in 2022 race>

    Local Matters: Oklahoma schools superintendent leaves Republican party, challenges governor in 2022 race

    CBS News Logo CBS News
  • Michigan couple exchanges vows in hospital after Covid-19 fight Michigan couple exchanges vows in hospital after Covid-19 fight>

    Michigan couple exchanges vows in hospital after Covid-19 fight

    NBC News Logo NBC News
  • Lofgren on Trump Jan. 6 lawsuit: Nixon tried to make same case and lost Lofgren on Trump Jan. 6 lawsuit: Nixon tried to make same case and lost>

    Lofgren on Trump Jan. 6 lawsuit: Nixon tried to make same case and lost

    MSNBC Logo MSNBC
  • Jonathan Isaac speaks after criticism for not receiving vaccine Jonathan Isaac speaks after criticism for not receiving vaccine>

    Jonathan Isaac speaks after criticism for not receiving vaccine

    FOX News Logo FOX News
> > > > >
  • Colin Powell addressing the Veterans of Foreign Wars in 1991. Colin Powell addressing the Veterans of Foreign Wars in 1991.> Colin Powell dies at 84 Colin Powell, the first Black US secretary of state whose leadership in several Republican administrations helped shape American foreign policy in the last years of the 20th century and the early years of the 21st, has died from complications from Covid-19, his family said on Facebook. CNN's Wolf Blitzer looks back on his life and career. CNN Logo CNN
  • Messages sent before kidnapping in Haiti show last location of group Messages sent before kidnapping in Haiti show last location of group> Messages sent before kidnapping in Haiti show last location of group CNN's Matt Rivers examines the last moves of the missionary group that was kidnapped in Haiti, reportedly by the 400 Mawozo gang - a dangerous and well-known group. CNN Logo CNN
  • Mother of Ahmaud Arbery: We will get justice for Ahmaud Mother of Ahmaud Arbery: We will get justice for Ahmaud> Mother of Ahmaud Arbery: We will get justice for Ahmaud The Ahmaud Arbery trial entering its jury selection phase is discussed by his mother Wanda Cooper-Jones and her attorney Lee Merritt in conversation with Joy Reid. MSNBC Logo MSNBC
UP NEXT UP NEXT

The reality, fortunately, appears less grim after the U.S. Coast Guard announced last week that the early October spill is estimated to be only about one-fifth of what was initially feared. Officials had reckoned up to 144,000 gallons of oil leaked into the Pacific Ocean; the new estimate is closer to 25,000 gallons. 

The California city of Huntington Beach, known as Surf City USA, is in the early stages of recovering from an oil spill. © Mario Tama, Getty Images The California city of Huntington Beach, known as Surf City USA, is in the early stages of recovering from an oil spill.

Multiple investigations are examining everything from the cause of the spill to possible delays in reporting the accident, which may have worsened the spill. For now, officials believe an anchor from a cargo ship may have sliced open the pipeline.

Loading...

Load Error

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

From our editor to your inbox: Editor-in-chief Nicole Carroll takes you behind the scenes of the newsroom in this weekly newsletter

About a week after the oil spilled just miles from the iconic beach, it reopened to the public and its surfing crowds. The beach still remained fairly empty throughout the week, save for hundreds of orange and neon green vests that dotted the coastline: Workers cleaning up oil.

But surfers were relieved – and surprised – to see their home on the water open so quickly. 

The jarring turnaround, officials and experts say, was the result of aggressive measures by government officials who learned lessons from past spills, a rapid response by environmental groups, lucky timing for some marine life, and weather conditions and currents that prevented the spill from forever changing the coastline of the Southern California beach. 

Floating barriers known as booms were in place Oct. 4 to try to protect the Talbert Marsh wetlands after an oil spill off Huntington Beach, California. © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP Floating barriers known as booms were in place Oct. 4 to try to protect the Talbert Marsh wetlands after an oil spill off Huntington Beach, California.

How weather, ocean currents helped Huntington Beach avert disaster

The first notifications about the spill didn’t sound alarms in "Surf City USA."

Huntington Beach Mayor Kim Carr told USA TODAY she learned of a possible spill on the morning of Oct. 2, and no one seemed to be especially worried. The city’s Pacific Airshow was underway, an annual event that typically brings 1.5 million people to the tourist-dependent area. 

But throughout that afternoon, Carr said, reports seemed to indicate developing concern. The U.S. Coast Guard didn’t expect oil to reach the shoreline until days later, on Oct. 4, Carr said. But boaters reported oil closing in on the city’s coast. 

WATCH: How some of the most historic oil spills in U.S. history are still affecting us today

By that evening, oil was washing ashore, days before Carr said it had been predicted. 

California has lost more than 91% of its historic wetlands, and some of the surviving 9% are in Huntington Beach. By late afternoon, booms – floating barriers to prevent oil from escaping – were deployed across the city to protect some of the fragile wetlands, which provide habitat for 90 species of birds and other wildlife. Carr says the move helped contain the damage to the area and its wildlife.

Another crucial element was something crews had no way of controlling: the weather and currents that changed the direction of the spill. 

Southern California saw an onslaught of unusual and extreme weather events in the weeks after the spill. Large thunderstorms, widespread rain, wind gusts up to 50 mph and 11-foot waves struck the bottom half of the state the week after the spill,  said NOAA senior meteorologist Alex Tardy. 

The conditions not only made it hard for meteorologists to estimate how much oil leaked into the ocean, Tardy said, but could have influenced the path of the spill.

“Oil moves with the ocean current and ocean waves,” he said. “With thunderstorms, heavy rain and gusty winds, you’re probably going to disrupt it.”

Oil spill sends dead birds, fish onto California beaches: This map shows how big it really is

But then came sunny weather and calm skies. Ocean currents, invisible to the human eye but constantly moving, along with the strong winds had pushed much of the oil south toward San Diego and away from Huntington Beach.

While oil concentrated in one area can be easier to clean up, it can suffocate wildlife and the ecosystem. 

“By being proactive, getting a little bit lucky with the weather ... we dodged a bullet,” Carr said. 

California oil spill could have been 'a whole lot worse' for wildlife

As beachgoers and surfers were welcomed back to Huntington Beach, the damage below the water and sand were still unclear. Oil continues to wash ashore, and tides coming in and out are mixed with chunks of tar.

Oil spills have historically hurt marine life and underwater ecosystems, reducing populations of sea creatures and decimating smaller life forms like plankton. They can harm coral reefs, which can have a ripple effect on the larger ecosystem.

The animal most people see affected first are sea birds. The Oiled Wildlife Care Network, a statewide agency that cares for wildlife after oil spills, said 77 oiled birds had been recovered. Of those, 47 died. Eleven fish were found dead from the oil. 

A worker with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife examines a sanderling contaminated by the oil spill in Huntington Beach, California. © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP A worker with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife examines a sanderling contaminated by the oil spill in Huntington Beach, California.

“This could have been a whole lot worse,” said wildlife veterinarian Ole Alcumbrac, noting the time of year probably helped reduce the toll.

“The birds, specifically, really lucked out because it was after the nesting season and before migration along the Pacific Flyway started, so there could have been a lot more birds in the area, or birds that were vulnerable because they were still nesting."

The damage under the water will take time and a “crystal ball to predict," Alcumbrac said. Some animals probably swam through the pollution and may have ingested toxins, which can pose long-term side effects. Many were displaced by the oil and would be searching for new homes. 

Cultural, economic affects remain mostly invisible along California coast

Huntington Beach was notably empty on a sunny afternoon last week. Dozens of bikers and joggers cruised along the bike path, but few ventured onto the sand.

Russ Jones, 64, was one of the only surfers out. He has lived in Huntington Beach for 40 years, and he surfs at least twice a week. The swell was good on this day, he said.

Jones was around for Huntington Beach’s 1990 oil spill, which leaked more than 400,000 gallons of crude oil into the Pacific Ocean, and he feared the same disaster 30 years later. But the October spill is projected to have leaked much less oil than the 1990 spill and much less than originally feared.

Oil washes up on Huntington Beach on Oct. 4. © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP Oil washes up on Huntington Beach on Oct. 4.

Jones was surprised the beach opened again so quickly, but he was happy nonetheless.

“Surfing is a huge part of my life,” he said. “So when they shut down something like that, it really affects you mentally and physically, because it’s therapeutic and it’s exercise. It clears your head.”

Cultural and economic harm may be the biggest, yet most invisible, result of the spill. 

Opinion: Latest California oil spill paints grim picture for future generations

California’s Department of Fish and Wildlife shut down all fisheries in the area on Oct. 4, and they remained closed as of Thursday. Southern California also has a large community of shore-based fishers – people who fish from the beach, jetties and piers, said California State University Channel Islands environmental science professor Sean Anderson. 

“Those shore-based fishing communities tend to be dominated by first-generation immigrants, a majority from Southeast Asia,” Anderson said. 

Fisheries will suffer economic damage, as well as the businesses that line the Huntington Beach coastline, which already have been battered by the pandemic. Then there are people on the shore who aren't just fishing for money – they’re fishing for dinner.

Until the spill is cleared, the effect on their way of life will remain very real.

>Full screen 1/30 SLIDES © PATRICK T. FALLON, AFP via Getty Images
An oil platform (L) stands offshore as cargo shipping container ships wait in the Pacific Ocean to enter the Port of Los Angeles and Port of Long Beach on October 15, 2021 as seen before sunrise from Signal Hill, California.
2/30 SLIDES © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP
Workers in protective suits continue to clean the contaminated beach in Huntington Beach, Calif., Monday, Oct. 11, 2021. Huntington Beach reopened its shoreline this morning after water testing results came back with non-detectable amounts of oil associated toxins in ocean water, city officials and California State Parks announced.
3/30 SLIDES © Mario Tama, Getty Images
A beachgoer watches as cleanup workers search for contaminated sand and seaweed along the mostly empty Huntington Beach about one week after an oil spill from an offshore oil platform on October 9, 2021 in Huntington Beach, California. The heavy crude oil spill affected close to 25 miles of coastline in Orange County. Huntington Beach is open but the public is not allowed to enter the water.
4/30 SLIDES © Mario Tama, Getty Images
A person sits on a mostly empty Huntington Beach about one week after an oil spill from an offshore oil platform on October 9, 2021 in Huntington Beach, California. The heavy crude oil spill affected close to 25 miles of coastline in Orange County. The beach is open in Huntington Beach but the public is not allowed to enter the water.
Slideshow continues on the next slide 5/30 SLIDES © FREDERIC J. BROWN, AFP via Getty Images
People sit on beach chairs as a cleanup crew works on the beach on Oct. 7, 2021 in Newport Beach, Calif. Beaches normally thronged with surfers and sunbathers are deserted as California races to clean up a huge oil spill. Up to 131,000 gallons of crude could have leaked into the Pacific Ocean on the west coast of the United States when a pipeline ruptured at the weekend.
6/30 SLIDES © PATRICK T. FALLON, AFP via Getty Images
In this aerial image taken on Oct. 7, 2021 clean up crews collect bags of debris from the beach after an oil spill in the Pacific Ocean in Newport Beach, Calif.
7/30 SLIDES © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP
Workers in protective suits clean the contaminated beach in Corona Del Mar after an oil spill in Newport Beach, Calif., on Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021. More than five days after an offshore pipeline ruptured off the Southern California coast, there’s still no confirmation of exactly how much oil has spilled into the ocean.
8/30 SLIDES © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP
Boats deploy floating barriers known as booms in a water channel as workers in protective suits clean the contaminated beach in Corona Del Mar after an oil spill in Newport Beach, Calif., on Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021.
9/30 SLIDES © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP
A worker in protective suit cleans the contaminated beach after an oil spill in Newport Beach, Calif., on Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021.
Slideshow continues on the next slide 10/30 SLIDES © Patrick T. Fallon, AFP via Getty Images
This aerial picture taken on October 4, 2021 shows environmental response crews cleaning up oil that flowed near the Talbert marsh and Santa Ana River mouth, creating a sheen on the water after an oil spill in the Pacific Ocean in Huntington Beach, California.
11/30 SLIDES © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP
Oil washed up on Huntington Beach, Calif., on Monday, Oct. 4, 2021. A major oil spill off the coast of Southern California fouled popular beaches and killed wildlife while crews scrambled Sunday, to contain the crude before it spread further into protected wetlands.
12/30 SLIDES © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP
Crews continue to clean the oil in the Wetlands Talbert Marsh after an oil spill in Huntington Beach, Calif., on Huntington Beach, Calif., on Monday, Oct. 4, 2021. A major oil spill off the coast of Southern California fouled popular beaches and killed wildlife while crews scrambled Sunday, to contain the crude before it spread further into protected wetlands.
13/30 SLIDES © Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP
A worker with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife examines a sanderling contaminated by the oil spill in Huntington Beach, Calif., on Oct. 4. A major oil spill off the coast of Southern California fouled popular beaches and killed wildlife while crews scrambled to contain the crude before it spread further into protected wetlands.
14/30 SLIDES © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP
An aerial photo shows floating barriers known as booms to try to stop further incursion into the Wetlands Talbert Marsh after an oil spill in Huntington Beach, Calif., on Huntington Beach, Calif., on Monday, Oct. 4, 2021.
Slideshow continues on the next slide 15/30 SLIDES © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP
Oil is shown washed up in Huntington Beach, Calif., Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021. One of the largest oil spills in recent Southern California history fouled popular beaches and killed wildlife while crews scrambled Sunday to contain the crude before it spread further into protected wetlands. At least 126,000 gallons (572,807 liters) of oil spilled into the waters off Orange County, according to a statement from the city of Huntington Beach.
16/30 SLIDES © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP
Lifeguards ready to post signs warning that water contact may cause illness, as they close the beach after an oil spill in Huntington Beach, Calif., Sunday., Oct. 3, 2021. The closure stretched from the Huntington Beach Pier nearly 4 miles (6.4 kilometers) south to the Santa Ana River jetty amid summerlike weather that would have brought beachgoers to the wide strand for volleyball, swimming and surfing. Yellow caution tape was strung between lifeguard towers to keep people away.
17/30 SLIDES © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP
A posted traffic sign announces the cancellation of the Pacific Air Show due to an oil spill in Huntington Beach, Calif., Sunday., Oct. 3, 2021. One of the largest oil spills in recent Southern California history fouled popular beaches and killed wildlife while crews scrambled Sunday to contain the crude before it spread further into protected wetlands.
18/30 SLIDES © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP
Cleanup contractors deploy skimmers and floating barriers known as booms to try to stop further oil crude incursion into the Wetlands Talbert Marsh in Huntington Beach, Calif., Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021.
19/30 SLIDES © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP
A sign posted on the sand reads "Oil Rig Archy," after oil washed up on Huntington Beach, Calif., on Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021. A major oil spill off the coast of Southern California fouled popular beaches and killed wildlife while crews scrambled Sunday, to contain the crude before it spread further into protected wetlands.
20/30 SLIDES © Ringo Chiu, AP
Crews deploy skimmers and floating barriers known as booms to try to stop further incursion into the Wetlands Talbert Marsh in Huntington Beach, Calif., Sunday., Oct. 3, 2021. One of the largest oil spills in recent Southern California history fouled popular beaches and killed wildlife while crews scrambled Sunday to contain the crude before it spread further into protected wetlands.
21/30 SLIDES © Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP
Cleanup contractors deploy skimmers and floating barriers known as booms to try to stop further oil crude incursion into the Wetlands Talbert Marsh in Huntington Beach, Calif., Sunday., Oct. 3, 2021. One of the largest oil spills in recent Southern California history fouled popular beaches and killed wildlife while crews scrambled Sunday to contain the crude before it spread further into protected wetlands.
22/30 SLIDES © Mario Tama, Getty Images
Oil is washed up on Huntington State Beach after a 126,000-gallon oil spill from an offshore oil platform on October 3, 2021 in Huntington Beach, California. The spill forced the closure of the popular Great Pacific Airshow with authorities urging people to avoid beaches in the vicinity.
23/30 SLIDES © Michael Heiman, Getty Images
Oil and sea water collect in a tide pool after a 126,000-gallon oil spill from an offshore oil platform on October 3, 2021 in Newport Beach, California. The spill forced the closure of the popular Great Pacific Airshow with authorities urging people to avoid beaches in the vicinity.
24/30 SLIDES © Ringo Chiu, AP
A Marine Spill Response Corporation (MSRC) vessel, foreground, an oil spill removal organization (OSRO), deploys floating barriers known as booms to try to stop further incursion of an oil slick off Huntington Beach, Calif., Sunday., Oct. 3, 2021. A major oil spill off the coast of Southern California fouled popular beaches and killed wildlife while crews scrambled Sunday to contain the crude before it spread further into protected wetlands.
25/30 SLIDES © Ringo Chiu, AP
Oil washed up on Huntington Beach, Calif., on Sunday., Oct. 3, 2021.
26/30 SLIDES © PATRICK T. FALLON, AFP via Getty Images
A person shows oil on their fingers after touching it on the beach in Huntington Beach, Calif. on October 3, 2021, after a pipeline breach connected to an oil rig off shore started leaking oil, according to an Orange County Supervisor.
27/30 SLIDES © PATRICK T. FALLON, AFP via Getty Images
Surfers that planned on surfing look at oil on the beach in Huntington Beach, Calif. on October 3, 2021, after a pipeline breach connected to an oil rig off shore started leaking oil, according to an Orange County Supervisor.
28/30 SLIDES © PATRICK T. FALLON, AFP via Getty Images
Oil is seen on the beach in Huntington Beach, Calif. on October 3, 2021, after a pipeline breach connected to an oil rig off shore started leaking oil, according to an Orange County Supervisor.
29/30 SLIDES © Ringo Chiu, AP
A woman takes a picture of oil washed up on Huntington Beach, Calif., Sunday., Oct. 3, 2021. A major oil spill off the coast of Southern California fouled popular beaches and killed wildlife while crews scrambled Sunday to contain the crude before it spread further into protected wetlands.
30/30 SLIDES © Ringo Chiu, AP
A seagull flies over oil washed up by the coast in Huntington Beach, Calif., on Sunday., Oct. 3, 2021.
30/30 SLIDES

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: 'We dodged a bullet': California oil spill could have decimated Huntington Beach. Why didn't it?

Source : https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/we-dodged-a-bullet-california-oil-spill-could-have-decimated-huntington-beach-why-didnt-it/ar-AAPEzdY

13840
This Member of the Beach Boys Is Actually Deaf in 1 Ear (And It Made Him a ‘Better Musician’)

Source:The Cheat Sheet

This Member of the Beach Boys Is Actually Deaf in 1 Ear (And It Made Him a ‘Better Musician’)

California oil spill: City, state beaches in Huntington Beach reopen; visitors urged to use caution

Source:USA Today

California oil spill: City, state beaches in Huntington Beach reopen; visitors urged to use caution

Beaches of LA are gone, but Christian Wolanin is happy to be with Buffalo Sabres

Source:Buffalo News

Beaches of LA are gone, but Christian Wolanin is happy to be with Buffalo Sabres

Looking for a beach bar? Here are our favorite ones across Florida

Source:YAHOO!News

Looking for a beach bar? Here are our favorite ones across Florida

Peyton Watson ready to contribute for UCLA after winning FIBA gold medal for USA

Source:Press-Telegram

Peyton Watson ready to contribute for UCLA after winning FIBA gold medal for USA